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Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Mon May 02, 2011 1:51 am

Today it was back to the caddy fins. As always, every step took much longer than expected. But the fins are installed now; real progress was made. They remain far from perfect. For some reason they went on curved, not true, though the fins themselves had been straight before installation. Not sure what happened there, but it's too late now. Still, you have to be looking for this flaw to really notice it. Fillets of Evercoat Metal Glaze were applied, as you'll see in the photos below. But a lot of sanding—and still some more puttying—remain to fully finish them up. After that, it's time to attach that signature nose to the main hull. Here are today's photo uploads:

Left over from last week: I sanded straight and flush the exhaust bells of the engine nacelles.
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Getting the caddy fin spread angle correct.
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My jury-rigged positioning jig for permanently gluing on the caddies. Little of any aspect of this hull is actually "true," so much of my Seaview work has unavoidably been eyeballed thus far. Here, however, I step up my game with with an awkward mechanical contrivance to try to get the fins mounted at regular, consistent angles from the hull—in addition to the 97° spread between the caddies discussed earlier. Again, my results were not perfect, but not half bad either.
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Beginning the masking process for the fillets.
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Now fully masked.
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Here comes the Evercoat.
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And now the sanding begins.
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Fillets in. As I said above, more sanding, spot filling and cleanup work now awaits, but I'm off to a good start.
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More next weekend,
Jeff
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue May 10, 2011 1:45 am

Took some time off work to enjoy a long birthday weekend. As such, essentially put in 3.5 of the last 4 days on Seaview and made some decent progress. Here we go...

Cutting out the sail hole in the deck for lighting wiring and fairwater plane articulation access.
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Cutting out the areas behind where the limber hole overlays will go on the superstructure. Major cuts with a Dremel. Finishing cuts with a toothed x-Acto blade. Then sanded down the rough edges.
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Holes all cut out.
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Epoxy-ing on the limber hole overlays.
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Time to see how she's looking...
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Limber hole view from the inside. At this point I added more Z-poxy around the edges of the holes to make sure these overlays aren't gonna pop off.
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Time to get serious: finally tack-gluing the nose piece on with a lot of CA.
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Prepping the tack-glued nose edges with tape to make sure the liquid resin of the next stage doesn't leak out.
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Following Mr. Merriman's Seaview build advice, I stuffed some fiberglass down inside the manta fins, then poured liquid resin in, rolling the model all around to spread the resin evenly around the entire joint. It cooked off pretty quickly. The combination of CA topped by a lot of casting resin and even that fiberglass means these nose pieces ain't never gonna come apart! In the first shot you can see the end of the strip of added fiberglass off to the side. In the next, you can clearly see the catalyzed white resin along the nose joint below the bow windows. I was really proud of myself for not making a total mess of this process—especially after getting CA all over everything (including me!) when tack-gluing earlier and having to sand a lot of that crud off the outer hull before moving on to this step.
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Now the Evercoat Metal Glaze goes on liberally all around the outer nose joint to fill in the few areas where the halves didn't marry precisely.
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With blue crud sanded away and tape removed. This took a long time, was a lot of work, and even involved a whole second application and sanding job not documented here. Should come out okay though, once Steve Neill's signature paint job is eventually applied.
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J B Weld-ing the forward indexing lip into place. On my boat this will be a permanent joint and (I hope) a well-hidden seam. But that forward end of the hull behind the nose will still need the robust support.
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Finally the fun starts! Deck detail begins with epoxy-ing the non-skid/safety track into place on the afterdeck. This was that corrugated Evergreen styrene pattern mentioned somewhere above. Missile hatches will come next.
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More next week,
Jeff
Last edited by JefftyToo on Thu May 12, 2011 1:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby PaulC » Tue May 10, 2011 7:25 pm

Happy Birthday, Skipper!

You just can't get enough of that Dremel can you?
Warm regards,

Paul Crozier
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Mon May 16, 2011 2:17 am

Thanks for the birthday greeting, Paul...!

Spent most of today (Sunday) puttying and sanding with not much to show for it—except for a few additional minor (and disappointing) setbacks. However, there is the following to report:

I finished sanding/smoothing the caddy fin fillets. They turned out pretty well, I think.
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I started the process of fixing and filling the removable, eventually manually articulated mini-sub bay doors. Long way to go on them yet.
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Started some more necessary Evercoat fixit work on the trailing edge of the caddy fins and the nacelle tail fins.
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Rewarded myself with some fun work: Aye, thar be missile hatches now...
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More next time,
Jeff
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue May 17, 2011 1:17 am

Tonight: Deck hatches!
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Later,
Jeff
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby greenman407 » Tue May 17, 2011 8:19 am

Jeff, are those missle hatches plastic? Where did you come up with them? Looks real good. Keep er coming. :D
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue May 17, 2011 11:06 pm

Thanks, Greenman. Those missile hatches actually came with my Teskey kit lo those nine years or so ago. I think Rick cast them up somehow—they look and feel more like resin than styrene, and they're too irregular to be tiddlywinks or other manufactured toy or game pieces. Actually, they seem slightly too small and a bit too thick to be "scale," but they'll still do nicely, I believe. I'm committed now, regardless. Thanks for following along!

Jeff
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue May 24, 2011 2:23 am

Took a vacation day from work Monday, the 23rd, to make it a three-day boat-working weekend. As usual, Saturday was occupied by life maintenance, but I've been hard at it since then.

Sunday involved a lot more assorted puttying and sanding, so not much to show for it here. However, I did re-spray the inside of the nose—essentially the bow window wall only—so it'll be ready for later Observation Room installation, and also so Steve won't have to do it. Of course, you won't really see the backside of the window wall when you look through from the front, but the Voyage movie and color TV pilot showed these film set walls to be beige-y. I chose a small can of flat "sand" color which seemed to work well enough. Again, it won't really matter, since most of what you'll see of the O.R. through those bow windows will be "wood paneling," but I wanted that front wall surface to be a light color so it'll better reflect the eventual overhead white LED lighting to help illuminate the room overall.

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Also managed to scribe in the faux bow planes. I decided long ago I didn't want articulated ones; I know they're not necessary for functionality, and besides, I've seen movable Seaview bow planes elsewhere and I think they ruin the look. (To each his own.) Aficionados among you will recall that on the later TV iteration of the Seaview (the deBoer and Moebius versions most of you have been modeling, in other words), these planes are angled into a sort of trapezoid shape on their inboard sides. However, for my own First TV Season version (the same miniatures and footage as used in the movie), Seaview closeups show ovoid/elliptical bow plane scribings, so this is what I've reproduced here. Check out the minefield sequence of the movie or some First Season close passbys if you don't believe me. ;-)

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On to Monday (today):

I first finished up shaping and sanding work on the engine nacelle side fins, shown here. Any necessary additional finesse work shall be left up to Steve.

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Also finished up—at least for now—work on the Mini-Sub Bay doors. My original attempt to fit them using Evercoat fill around their edges (seen somewhere above) didn't work at all, so beginning Sunday I shifted to thinly machined strips of Evergreen styrene CA'd into place and this worked much better. These installed strips were then smoothed in with Nitro-Stan body putty. I drilled tiny holes in the door edge corners and bay openings and used assorted-size watchband pins as tiny hinges. These were available from the local watch repair place for cheap. Of course, nothing in this trying door assembly actually fit or worked as I'd planned—the tiny drilled holes broke through and had to be Evercoat-filled, the spring-loaded hinges wound up being fixed in place with glue, etc. In other words, the whole thing was a wasteful, time-consuming pain-in-the-butt…but at least these messy results are on the keel and won't be seen much. In fact, the doors will be removed during running anyway (only put in place for static display), and I suppose even sloppy Mini-Sub Bay doors are better than no doors at all. Once again, I'm counting on Steve's luxurious paint job to divert undue visual attention. They're not quite as cleaned up as I hope to eventually get them, but these pix will give you an idea:

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On to the cleats! Yes, I know it's sacrilege to you filming miniature purists, but long ago I'd decided to "upgrade'" my Seaview by adding detail from the full-size deck set, plus extrapolate deck detail not shown but which would exist on a real submarine of the era. As such, before running out of steam tonight I managed to install four of what will eventually be eleven cleats (again, some were shown regularly on the show, others will be strictly my speculation), plus a capstan. I'm even considering installing a chock back aft, but haven't decided yet. Installation of these goodies is laborious and tedious. All white metal parts (these came from Floating Drydock in proper 1/96 scale) first have to be etched, then carefully drilled for brass rod installation. The rods go down deep into the deck presumably to keep the tiny parts from popping off while on patrol. CA alone just ain't enough.

Anyway, here are a couple pics of the first few cleats. I'm using rollers and standards positioned just like on a real boat. Capstan too. Lots more to go. Oh, I don't believe you've seen that I've also installed that famous sonar dome on the foredeck. Lookin' good now that the hatches and safety track are in. The newly added details are already making it start to look like—omigosh—a submarine. About a zillion grab irons, seen on the 17-ft. miniature, are next, after all the cleats are in.

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More next week,
Jeff
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby SteveNeill » Thu May 26, 2011 3:14 pm

Jeff all excellent work my friend.

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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Fri May 27, 2011 12:04 am

Sincere thanks, Steve! That means a lot to me. She'll be in your capable hands very soon, buddy—just a couple more weeks...

Jeff
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby Sub culture » Sun May 29, 2011 6:00 am

Nice work. A tip for you, getting defined edges with polyester fillers is tricky, because the fillers tend to be a bit soft and fragile for that sort of work. I find epoxy based putty like Milliput fine white are MUCH better for that sort of thing. It sets much harder, and is tougher to work, but you will end up with a very good result. Also you can sculpt with epoxy by dipping the tools in water (or use a little saliva) and moulding it to shape- this saves a lot of sanding and filing later on.

Another thing I do is make up my own fillers using resin and silica, this is much tougher than normal polyester fillers which are designed chiefly for easy sanding over large areas. I only use that for making very small localized repairs, or repairing gelcoat failure.
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue May 31, 2011 12:29 am

All good info.—thanks! Actually I'm a big fan of Milliput, though haven't had much luck with the white variety. I was afraid the Evercoat Metal Glaze might be too soft in this application, but was/am in a hurry and wanted to try it. I may live to regret that decision, but so far, so good. Thanks again!

Jeff
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue May 31, 2011 1:19 am

Another lengthy, frustrating two-day work session. But my handoff deadline is fast approaching, and I'm so far behind where I'd like to be at this point that earlier today I even gave up my annual attendance at the Memorial Day Submarine Ceremony at Seal Beach's Naval Weapons Station in order to keep working. Thankfully, it'll be held there again next year, and believe me, I've given our honored lost submariners plenty lot of thought in recent weeks. I do hope anyone reading this had a pleasant but likewise contemplative Memorial Day holiday.

The good Seaview news: her deck cleats are all in and she now has grab irons that won't quit! Of course, the underwater hatch/deck set of Fox's studio filming tank shows the irons in one quantity and configuration, while the above-water 1:1 superstructure set shows them in quite another. Further, the brief, faraway glimpses we infrequently get of the grab irons gracing the 17-ft. miniature's afterdeck show them in yet a third—thus carrying on the apparent tradition of having none of details of the miniatures and sets in this show match each other in any significant way. We're just not supposed to notice, is all.

Facing the above inconsistencies, I felt free to create something of an amalgam, installing a grab iron arrangement combining elements of all three and then extrapolating the pattern into areas never really shown. Of course, how many grab irons there are (or aren't) and where they're placed doesn't really matter a whit. What's important—to me, at least—is simply adding a lot of eye candy to a miniature submarine hull that's otherwise overly simple. By the way, I used 1/87 HO railroad scale "drop style" grab irons from A-LINE and bent them to shape for the curved rails flanking the deck hatches, and A-LINE's "stirrup steps" for the standard grab irons everywhere else (thank you, Mark "The Small Sub Guy" Jones, for introducing me to this source). They're actually noticeably too big for the 1/96 scale of this boat, but again, it's just hardware detail of any sort I was looking to add. Besides, the missile hatches look a little too small and the safety track a little too wide, so why shouldn't the grab irons appear a little too large? Once fully painted and out on the water she'll look just fine! (And boy, does this messy hull need some paint! Can't wait to see that first coat of primer go on!)

The bad news? Well, significant amounts of CA got away from me again, requiring a lot of frustrating cleanup and hull sanding. That thin stuff's really dangerous! I know now I can't trust myself with it and have vowed to use only the thicker flavors from here on in. Oh, and while checking the DVDs for grab iron placement suggestions, I found I'd installed four deck cleats in obviously wrong positions. Arrggh! So: out came those four, with new holes drilled, the old holes puttied over…you know the drill. But it was worth it; to me they do look better now.

Check out these finished deck shots of cleats and grab irons:

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Yes, I did get a little carried away with those grab irons. But as I say, the miniatures showed some, the deck sets others—I simply elected to represent them all. They'll look much better when painted.

Another interesting note for you purists, and I just noticed this recently: the miniatures, and thus the variously-sized Moebius Seaviews, all show their deck hatches facing forward. But the full-size sets show them facing aft! Nevertheless, I chose to face mine forward as seen on most versions. But I'm guessing this additional inconsistently (in what is certainly a long line!) can only be explained by the Art Director enjoying too many martinis and cigars in one of those easy chairs on the Observation Room set between takes!

Next it was time to re-tackle the sail. You may recall I'd overly sanded my original and had to order a replacement from Mr. Merriman. It'd had obvious trouble in the molding process however, and came to me misaligned and in need of repair. So, before making my second attempt at installing acrylic deadlights, first I had to do significant puttying, sanding, re-scribing and even replacing of portions of the two watertight doors. Here are shots of the process, still in progress.

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More next week,
Jeff
Last edited by JefftyToo on Tue May 31, 2011 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby SteveNeill » Tue May 31, 2011 1:07 pm

Looks great Jeff!

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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue May 31, 2011 11:18 pm

Thanks, Steve! Can't wait for you to get your mitts on 'er!

Jeff
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