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Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby U-33 » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:18 am

Fascinating...






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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Wed Sep 15, 2010 11:02 pm

Alright,
So once the glass has semi-cured, I trimmed the parts with my Exacto knife...a very good time to do this. I let the parts cure all the way after that before doing any more work on them.

Once cure, I glue the top cap profile to the tops of the rudders. These were bolstered with baking soda soaked in CA to make an ultra hard grout. A tape dam was made around the parts and Evercoat was applied within. I removed the tape when the plastic was only partially cured and slid my knife along the profile of the caps to prevent excess sanding later. I then let the plastic cure and began the process of sculpting the shapes using a file and some sandpaper.

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Once happy with my rough profile shape, I began the process of filling the fibreglass weave and all the minor divots using a red one part glaze. Very thin coatings are needed, and once dried I would block sand using 220. Then prime so you can see all the flaws and then repeat the whole process over and over until perfection is achieved! Not to say that I have achieved it yet with these parts...

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Here’s a look at the beginning of the stern cone which will have a PJ fit to it:

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Regards,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby Rogue Sub » Thu Sep 16, 2010 4:57 pm

Looks pretty labor intensive Joel.

Good thing you have plenty of time!
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Mon Sep 27, 2010 11:28 pm

We’re falling behind in reporting here, but I’ll do what I can to catch up.
Maybe I’ll just post a bunch of pictures...

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...and the cone assembly is ready for PJ installation upon it.
Next is the stern plane assembly front fillet...

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Lines showing where the plane parts will be split are lightly scribed into the part

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One piece moulds are used for these intermediate parts. This will allow for less flash and sprue removal and keep the reproductions faithful to the masters.

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To get the part out, I simply blow compressed air into the bottom hole used to hold the centering shaft into place.

Tomorrow I’ll post my experience with the dihedral master!
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Wed Sep 29, 2010 7:58 pm

Now, on to one of the more challenging pieces I’ve taken upon myself to build; the dihedral fins. Not cut and dry respectively speaking like say, the rudders, we have many compound and complex curves in this baby. Starting from the hull, we have a “normal” shaped fin that blends into a tapering housing that ends in a bulbous pressure vessel-ish nozzle shape. This end assembly has 3 discharge points: fat line sonar, thin line sonar, and a third which comes off the blended nozzle of which I have absolutely no idea of which function it serves. But then that’s probably why I’m still alive, because I don’t have all the answers to the mysteries that this boat holds!

Starting with the nozzle, it is machined on my lathe and attached to 2 brass tubes using CA and baking soda.

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The same process is used for the regular part of the fin, except I’m using Bondo instead of foam. Much quicker and more solid, I just wait until the Bondo is half cured then follow the fin profile shapes with a sharp knife: a very smooth process!
CA solidified cardboard is used to finish the taper shape.

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The parts glued together and in primer. There was lots of filling and flaw fixing here. I must have broken the taper off 4 times and re-glued it to get it right!

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Tape dam filled with Bondo
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Finally a fillet is added to the front using the same technique used on my stern plane master
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Regards,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:35 pm

On to the wide aperture array blisters. These will be quite different than anything released so far in the Seawolf world. All three blisters on each side are different sizes and shapes from each other, with the farthest aft being the most different by far. In finding the right profile and shape for this bad boy I bet I have stared at blown up pictures for countless hours trying to get these figured out. In doing this I have incorporated the use of several different image manipulating programs so I can fiddle around and confirm the shape that I have always suspected.

Let’s get started. I made the decision to go with thin styrene for use in the base shapes of the WAA that goes against the hull. I don’t think I would use this material for this kind of application again and you will find out why as I delve further into the depths of this build.

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The shapes are all measured on my hull and the transferred to styrene. The aft blister took me the better part of an afternoon getting right as I only have two views of it; side view and bottom view, no front or rear. I’m thanking the model submarine gods that this piece ended up being symmetrical because making 2 would not be cool. Anyways, to get the shape right I traced the side profile shape onto some paper, folded it in half and cut it out like one of those paper snowflakes that we used to make in elementary school. I made the shape over sized and simply refolded the paper until it’s two most extreme points matched up to my hull markings. From there this shape was transferred over to some thin styrene.

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The shapes where taped into place where they would be fit to the hull, the exception here being the middle one as it fits on parallel hull surface. The entire surface of the shapes were covered in tape so that even heat from my heat gun would reach the styrene without causing any distortion> by applying the heat this made the styrene conform perfectly to the hull (well almost perfect anyway).

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I do have information for front profile shapes of the front two blisters, so this shape was transferred over to cardboard, cut out and CA’d to the styrene.

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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Mon Oct 11, 2010 9:19 pm

Inside the cardboard dams I filled with body filler (not Evercoat) that is fairly hard to sand and coloured with red cream hardener. This is trowelled along my profile ribs for proper shape. I made sure all block sanding was done before the filler was completely cured!

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The long taper are added with an easy sand filler coloured with blue hardener

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From there, its a matter of sanding, priming, filling, repeat over and over until happy with the shapes.

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Next, I’ll scribe the sonar windows in
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Mon Oct 11, 2010 9:22 pm

From here, I put a 600 grit wet sandpaper finish on the parts and prepare them for moulds. Some notes on these parts, I wouldn’t use styrene and Bondo again because it seems that Bondo doesn’t want to stick really well to it. I found myself gluing the joints repeatedly between sanding because the two materials would split. Another problem was that the primer I use eats the styrene profusely so that my clean, sharp edges melted away on the parts. This is ok though, I’m going to make moulds of the parts and reproduce them, then do all final finishing on those parts. Experience has told me that that even pristinely reproduced parts will still need some touch up and refinishing, so I’m not going to waste my time here on that.
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2 sided carpet tape to hold the WAA’s down to my plug hull. Also pictured are some cabinet bumpers I was going to use for registration nipples, but i changed my mind as I’m not to make the kind of mould that needs those yet. I’ll wait until my final hull mould ‘till I get into those
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Stern planes

Postby ManOwaR » Sun Oct 31, 2010 3:22 pm

So, here is where we are right now:

The WAA blisters were all moulded and reproduced, these are put off to the side until the bottom half of the hull master is ready for detailing. The only thing of note to mention about these is that I put an extra dense surface coat of epoxy and talc in the moulds before glassing. This coating should give me a nice hard surface in which to scribe into later, and yes I will need to scribe as we have all the pump suction and discharge grates to put on and the middle WAA sonar windows need to be redone because I made them the wrong length the first time.

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Now, onto the stern planes and a description of what I have done here with these. In the beginning I made a single plane assembly that only had the plane demarcation break points scribed into it. I moulded that part and made three reproduction of it using some old crusty white Alumilite that has been sitting in my cupboard for the last year or so, perfect material for making master parts from. Each part was taped off along the lines in which they were to be separated from the rest of the plastic. The only exception here is I left a little extra material on the front the inside stern plane’s front edge because this will fit slightly into the stationary groove that will be provided on the stationary stern plane’s trailing edge.

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Each part was put in the vise (teeth grabbing the unused part of the plastic only) and then roughly hacksawed off. Trimming was done using my disc sander to remove plastic right up to where the tape was placed. Tape is a little better choice for this task as, believe it or not, it supplies a little protection from the possibility of removing too much material.

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The trailing edge grove is put into the stationary plane by wrapping some tube of appropriate diameter in some coarse sandpaper and running the part back and forth along it. Very slick, very easy and the results were far better than when I used the drill press on my Permit parts to try and accomplish the same thing.

The rounded edge on the front of the inside stern plane was simply taped off at a point back from the front of the part and the center lined was drawn in on the middle length wise. From here, I block sanded the round shape in, using the tape and the center line to know my limits as to where to stop sanding.

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With the shapes roughly shaped, I then inserted 1/8 rod through them into the outside stern plane. At the bottom of the part i used a cut-off exterior plane and putt the rods into that for alignment check. How do I know that the shafts are straight though the planes? Because they fit perfectly into the outside planes, bottom and top perfectly...not even the slightest bit of pressure had to be applied to the rods to get them to fit, YAY!

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To get the inside stern plane to have proper clearance and rotate smoothly within the stationary groove, sandpaper was slid in between the two part and slowly rocked the inside plane back and forth along it until I had fairly free move movement. The sandpaper was removed and I then had a perfectly shaped curved part that moved without inhibition with everything put on its proper shaft. Smooth.

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Now it’s just a matter of taping sandpaper to the hull where the plane will go and run the joining surface along that paper until the right size is achieved. I left the planes long actually with this in mind, but I still ended up going back and had to modify the fairing point in the front as it didn’t contact the hull properly.

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So where are we right now? Unfortunately, I had to go back and remake the intermediate hull moulds as they warped due to using two different manufactures products in their making. They were also too short because of some new, more accurate info I’ve received. An executive decision based on the reality that it easier to extend a single hull plug then to extend two half plugs and make them match properly...experience learned from my Jack project...The moulds are almost complete, so that means we can almost get into the negative detailing!

More to come,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby greenman407 » Tue Nov 02, 2010 12:33 pm

Some guys just have the gift! 8)
There are OLD pilots and there are BOLD pilots but there are very few OLD BOLD pilots. MAG
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Negative Detailing

Postby ManOwaR » Sat Nov 06, 2010 1:08 am

Do you ever get to the point where in a large project, you kind of lose sight of what the final goal is and become a zombie and just go through the motions? That’s where I was at before I started in on the topic at hand, redoing the hull intermediate moulds over again.

The Seawolf has so many fine details, and I want to include as many as these as possible on my 1/72 replication of it. Included in this list is the bevelling effect produced where the thick anachoatic coating reaches a place where it can’t cover and hereby has to faired into the spot, hence the bevelling. This is such a visible detail that I feel it undeniably has to be on my boat in order to be faithful to the real thing. Also, the more detail the better. So here we go, now we’re going to be negative and make a positive thing from that...if you know what I mean <grin>

So, I guess we’ll start with the concept. I had to figure out how I was going to do this. I could make a solid hull plug, gouge away material and then somehow build bevels there; a concept that never really grabbed my interest in the slightest. All it would mean is a lot of work and I’m not guaranteed a great finished product. I could also build out from my already finished hull, but then that wouldn’t be scale. My last option, and the one I chose is by using some quick and dirty intermediate moulds so I could make negative detailing within them and then make two hull half master patterns from those.

My work so far with this has been on the sail first because it smaller and will give a good feel as to how things will work out when I get to the hull. The sail’s coating thickness and the hull’s are different, but the following description works for both. I started out by sticking some of my new best friend (two sided carpet tape) onto any scrap wood I had kicking around the shop, leaving the release paper still stuck to the back of the tape. I then stuck another layer of tape on top of the release paper and this time I remove the release paper from this second ply. From there I applied styrene of the appropriate thickness onto the tape. Both sides of the wood are run through the table saw to get perfect flush edges. With the saw I’m using a fine tooth melamine blade to ensure against any kind of plastic chipping that might come about.

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The laminated wood is taken over to my bench, where I clamped another wider piece of wood (this was run through the saw to ensure straightness) to my bench that was also around the same length as the laminated one. I then clamped the laminated board to this other board ensuring both top surfaces were perfectly flush with each other. This provided me with a flat surface in which I could run my little laminate trimmer (router) along and shape the styrene plastic. I do have a router table, but it would be too much of a pain in the rear to dig it out and set it up, so I settled on this other contraption which worked just fine anyway. Some notes here, the router bit with the angle I wanted was special, it was extremely hard to find in town here, and when I did find it, they wanted a special price for it! Also, I found that for better, cleaner results the bit had to be run backwards, meaning the router was pulled towards me, not pushed as per the norm.

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After each length was routed, I took the board back over to my saw and cut the bevelled plastic and its wood that it is stuck to, and then took the board back over to the router. This was repeated until I felt I had far more bevel strips than I needed, which probably means not enough! Also, the plastic remains stuck to the wood until which time that it is needed.

From here, it is now a matter of applying my plastic to wherever it is needed. The hard part for me on this is getting my mind to work in a mirror image, negative world to apply this stuff correctly. Sometimes I get confused and make things wrong he he. Simply peel the plastic off the separation paper on the board and then apply where needed. The carpet tape is more than adequate at holding down whatever needs to be secured. I love this stuff; I have big plans for the future for it! Bevelled corners are a matter of using a knife to cut the styrene, and even if they don’t match perfectly I just use a touch of red putty. This is nice for me because hardwood doesn’t have this kind of error factor when doing trim on houses or countertops.

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Now, this is cool. I can do more than just bevelling on these negatives, in the sail’s case I added drain holes at the bottom, and troughs in which the sidelights and diesel exhaust louvers can be put into the final master. This means there are some major possibilities and potential on the hull to take that even further than originally envisioned!
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Sat Nov 06, 2010 1:14 am

A thick heavy coat of heavily talc-filled epoxy (with scribing in mind) is laid down and then glassed.

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Once cured I block sanded so that the edge of the sail halves were exactly flush with their moulds, thus providing perfect fit when removed

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Once pulled from the moulds most of the styrene stayed on them with the exception of a few stubborn pieces. An important thing to remember here when using sharp utensils to dig stuff out is to use sound safe procedure when doing so. I forgot to and ended up stabbing my left hand with a sharpened scribing tool when it slipped...Ha!

Anyways, here’s the beginning of the sail master and its cap that is ready for mould glassing. I’m pretty darn happy with these rough results turned out! I’m thinking this is going to worth the extra time taken to go the intermediate step.

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Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Fri Nov 12, 2010 8:23 pm

Continuing on with the bottom half of the hull, here is a bit of progress to show.
Going with the same technique as on the sail, I’m going with the thin strips of bevelling inside my markings, then filling in afterword with large area strips of styrene cut to the appropriate shapes.

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I wasn’t going to at first, but I decided to do a bit of filling to get the major gaps between the styrene strips out. At this stage of the game perfection isn’t necessary (later it is) and I could always sand the resultant upraised lines off when I do the final master plugs, but this now will help alleviate a little work down the line. My goal was not to get a “class A” flawless finish, just something that would give me the base I needed.

Before I filled, I taped off the bevelling on the plastic so that it wouldn’t get corrupted by the filler and primer, and to also protect the rest of the negative mould finish.

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...And with the masking removed:
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Notice at the front of the boat I installed a large amount styrene plastic around where the torpedo shutters are going to go. There will be so much detail in this area that I decided that it would simpler and be easier to take off my 2” coating on this step, and then build it back out when I have torpedo shutter details in place on the positive hull half mould. The percentage of eliminating possible errors increases here as well...

A quick look at the sail with its rough cap...I won’t install the cap permanently until all detailing is completed on it. Let’s say that that is a lesson learned from when I was working on the permit’s sail.
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Final Plug half fabrication

Postby ManOwaR » Thu Dec 09, 2010 1:24 am

Once I was happy with the negative detailing and its finish, it was time to make the final plug hull halves. Bear in mind here that the decision was made to do all fine finishing on the final plugs as opposed to try and transfer it from the intermediates. Experience tells me that I would have to do it twice, and who wants to do that much extra work for nothing?

As per usual when prepping fibreglass moulds for fibreglass reproductions several coats of release wax were applied and then a couple coats of Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) were sprayed on using my designated gun. For my PVA gun, I use a touch up gun with my air set to around 50 psi (at the gun) and disperse as fine as possible to allow for atomization. The finer the spray you can lay down, the less orange peel you’ll get from this stuff. Oh yes, I forgot to mention that before spraying I’ll wipe the first light coat using a clean rag onto the surface and into the details. You can cheat and not have to wait for drying by using a hair drier set on hot, but be careful of dust and the wispy PVA hairs that come out of the gun when spraying and just hang in the air...these have a terrible affinity for falling onto the freshly coated surface and can cause blemishes!

With my 2 part release combination applied (I’m making the Wolf mould from rubber so I don’t have to do this crap all the time in the future) I mixed up a very heavy epoxy batch using talc, anti-sag filler and some grey colouring and got most of the air out by putting it in vacuum chamber. I added a little heat to reduce viscosity and then applied the mixture to the mould with a brush. I waited until the coat was just tacky so I could add a couple of thick layers of woven roven to the “keel “of the plug only...of which is only there to support the hold down anchors.

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For hold down anchors I am doing the exact same thing as I did with my Jack moulds by using ¼” threaded rod cut to lengths, have a nut threaded on the end and then encapsulate it in an epoxy and reinforcement material, in this case was Kevlar chop that I wanted to try out for kicks and I just happened to have some kicking around. These rods were held in place by simply sliding them through appropriate sized holes drilled in some sticks.

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Next up, I had to add structural support to the whole plug, because after all it only has a thick coating of epoxy with a small strip of fibreglass down the spine. Just like my Jack, I’m using rigid foam again. This was applied in a few stages. The first was to mix up a batch and spread it around the mould surface, especially under the top edges where I used duct tape as sort of a barrier. From there, I mixed up several batches and worked my way up, only pouring when the last batch was getting hard and was a little tacky.

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This stuff is very tough when cured, so i had to use my belt sander to get the overflow foam down flush with the edges of my mould. I knew I was flush when I heard the sound of the belt hitting the mould, of which very resistant and wasn’t damaged. I knew I used aluminum powder in my mould surface coat for some reason, I just didn’t know what it was until know hehe.

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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby greenman407 » Thu Dec 09, 2010 11:33 am

Outstanding work, TOP SHELF!
There are OLD pilots and there are BOLD pilots but there are very few OLD BOLD pilots. MAG
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