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Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

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Intermediate Moulds part 3

Postby ManOwaR » Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:20 pm

Hello again folks,
Not many reports from my way lately but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been busy with the Wolf. Most of my free time has been used by doing quite a bit of digital work on the computer and learning to use my new Corel vector drawing program. This has allowed me to start making up my future scribing templates and detail art that will comprise the photo etching for this project...more on that later though when it’s more applicable.
Currently, here are the results of the cured intermediate hull moulds. These were a real pleasure to release from the plug as there are no details to get stuck into anything. Basically, I was able to work a small gap between the hull and mould with my hands using pressure then forced a few strips of cereal box cardboard in as wedges. Long strips of this cardboard were then slipped in underneath the hull and worked its way forward. It worked like a real beauty! It always pays to have big boxes of Lucky Charms kicking around, although my wife isn’t fond of all the box-less cereal bags in the pantry lol!

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I need to do “negative” detailing in these female moulds and that means I have to mark things out so I know where to place my objects. Again more cereal box is used by drawing circles of appropriate diameter with perpendicular lines drawn on them. The long line across the top is used to align the template with the flange of the mound. The center line on the templates is used to mark the center of the bottom of the mould.

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Tape is ran along my new marks and a final line is drawn long this to give me my center reference line.

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Lot and lot and lots to come,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Thu Aug 26, 2010 2:32 pm

Hello Everyone,
We’re back in some form or another with some new updates to report and a little new work to show.
In the spring it was decided that the shop/garage had to be cleaned and organized as it was to the point where no kind of work could be completed in any sort of manner in which frustration was not involved. It took a long time, but what a nice feeling to have that job accomplished!
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Summer time is not usually peak building time for me as we usually like to take vacation and do mostly family orientated stuff...same thing most people do I suppose. The first week of August brought a nasty surprise...When out skateboarding (yes skateboarding, you read that correctly) with my boys out front of the house, I snapped my Achilles tendon clean in half while doing a push-off. I had the injury surgically repaired and am now off for another three months for healing and rehab. Virtually useless, I am now and as it’s my right foot I can’t even drive. I am however, able to sit on a stool in the garage and do things at my workbench...so that means I am back on the Wolf, albeit in a somewhat limited capacity
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I am going to represent the anacoatic bevelling shown on the hull where the coating stops and pressure hull begins, just as a way to show as much detail for this boat as I can. To show this detail it has to be done on the negative intermediate moulds I have made, a far easier alternative than removing material from a positive plug.
To start, the mould must first be marked out...not such an easy task for a rounded with compounded shapes. Perpendicular lines in relation to my length-long center line are needed at my forward and aft reference points. This simply done using a long square using the straight long part of the hull as the reference
Straightedges are placed on these lines and then measurement can be transferred from print to mould. To mark the lines a straightedge is clamped to the hull minus the thickness of my pencil. Measurements are checked over, referred back to the prints and confirmed. Mistakes are found and corrected or a plan to correct them can be developed. In my case I have found that the hull will need to be extended exactly 13/16” to make it more accurate. This will mean making the positive hull halves in two pieces just like I did with the extended USS Jack. No big deal, I’m getting damn good at that!
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Regards,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby Al Nuci » Thu Aug 26, 2010 2:53 pm

Joel,

Seems as though you've gotten caught under that black cloud, and that wound looks like you'll definitely need to stay off your feet for a while, however, all the best in your recovery. Btw, that's a real nice recovery area you'll be spending your time in, and then maybe you can reschedule family events for this coming winter. Regards, Al,
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby greenman407 » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:05 pm

Hey, I saw a shop broom in the picture. What you need is a blower attachment for your weedwacker. Tell the wife that pushing the broom hurts your injury. Shell get you one right away!
There are OLD pilots and there are BOLD pilots but there are very few OLD BOLD pilots. MAG
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:08 pm

Thanks Al,
All I can really do is try to make a positive out of this negative experience. Working on the wolf and perhaps be able to get a large chunk of it it done is a massive positive :)
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:13 pm

greenman407 wrote:Hey, I saw a shop broom in the picture. What you need is a blower attachment for your weedwacker. Tell the wife that pushing the broom hurts your injury. Shell get you one right away!


Its up to her which tool she want to use, she's the only one able to clean it now anyway :lol:
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby GreyAkula52 » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:46 pm

Greetings!.....
Your build Looks Great!......
Your shop....... It's amazing.......
The Cleanliness Of Both!......... Priceless!!!!!
Andre S. Burgess, P.E.
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Thu Aug 26, 2010 8:10 pm

GreyAkula52 wrote:Greetings!.....
Your build Looks Great!......
Your shop....... It's amazing.......
The Cleanliness Of Both!......... Priceless!!!!!


Thank you Andre,
I know the Wolf will be clean, As for the garage staying that way? Uuuuh, well lets just be optamistic! :)
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby Scott T » Fri Aug 27, 2010 10:49 am

Hope you leg mends fast.
Try a carpenters pencil for making lines it works great for marking along flat surfaces.
Also they stay put and don't roll away.
They also sale mechanical carpenters pencil
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Fri Aug 27, 2010 11:52 pm

Damn! I have to admit here that your pencil is far better than my pencil!

Thanks,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Sat Sep 04, 2010 8:55 pm

Seeing as how I’m gimped it’s a little hard working with big stuff like the hull, so now I’m putting the hull to the side and I’ll start in on the small parts like the appendages.

For the fins I’m going a different route in making them than I did with my Permit. That time I went with solid MDF that I sculpted on my disc sander using jigs and various other tricks. This time I want to experiment with what could be called a “frame, foam and form” technique that implements a hot wire foam cutter. My reasons for the change? First I need a sure-fire way to get the shaft alignment 100% true as I had a hell of a time getting this right with the Permit. Second, I’m gimpy and I can do this while sitting down; I don’t have to standing at power tool station. Third, I am going to be using this technique on a larger scale for my next project, so I might as well get some practice!

Cereal box cardboard is once again the main construction material of day. Life Cereal cardboard to be exact, I use only the best. Side, top and bottom profiles drawn on paper are glued to the cardboard using Super 77 spray on contact glue. The shapes are all very carefully cut out using an #11 Exacto and after doing so, I wick extra thin CA into the cardboard creating a very rigid, strong material that can now be filed and/or sanded. I would almost describe the marriage or Life cereal cardboard and CA as a very hard plastic. Next, I drilled a 1/8” hole in the top and bottom shapes to represent the shaft as this will be the size of rod used for that purpose.


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With a 1/8” rod drilled into a block of wood, the bottom profile was slipped onto the rod and the main section of the sail was CA’d in a perpendicular fashion, along the center line and exactly 90 degrees using two blocks of wood to hold the part steady while drying.

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The rod is removed from the block, and the top profile is slid on. With alignment assured by matching up the back points and with the rod in the front I glued the parts together. I could then glue all the rest together and douse the whole thing in CA.

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Foam blocks are fit between the frame and glued in place using Ultra Blue RTV silicone. The whole thing is sandwiched between two blocks of wood in my vise waiting to dry...

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Next, we’ll form this part using a hot wire foam cutter.
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Thu Sep 09, 2010 11:46 pm

Continuing on with appendages...
Building up steam in the project, it’s amazing how having the use of both feet again makes working with your hands easier!

Once my Ultra blue RTV silicone cures (apparently it doesn’t take long at all – maybe an hour or so) I’ll run my hot wire along the CA-hardened top and bottom profiles and through the pink foam. Very neat, it cuts almost like a hot knife through butter. I must say that I enjoy doing this, its kinda fun really. It’s also very clean, as I don’t have mdf dust shooting up everywhere and all over my clothes and in my ears and hair. I also don’t have to wear a respirator – bonus number one!

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Just some notes here; these are preliminary masters. This means that in the case of the stern planes and the bow planes I make one part and one mould and from there I can pour a few parts that I can begin to split the many parts from. In this case, the stern plane will be poured three times and from those parts I will cut away the inside stern plane, outside stern plane and the stationary stern plane. I hope this makes sense? The purpose behind this madness is to achieve perfect fitting parts down the line.

After my foam has been cut I filled some fast set epoxy with talc and spread a thin skin of the compound over the fins. This is first step in giving these fins a little strength, and to make them workable.

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Regards,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Mon Sep 13, 2010 7:38 pm

The epoxy coating is sanded down smooth and Evercoat filler is applied. This in turn is sanded down smooth, and a coat of primer is applied. Any exposed foam is eaten away by the primer, so another round of filling is needed.

The decision is made to put a light skin of fiberglass to add strength to the fins and prevent any further foam indentations. A light coat of Super 77 is applied to the fins only and ½ ounce glass cloth is applied carefully so there are no wrinkles. I tinted a small batch of epoxy with my special “red oxide antifoul” pigment that I use for my fiber glass hull lay-ups. The purpose here is that when I prime the fins with grey I will be able to see how far down I’m going when sanding. I also heated the epoxy slightly with a hair drier to lessen the viscosity a bit, but not too much as to do an instantaneous cure and start my garage on fire or something. I painted the epoxy onto the fins, let soak for awhile and then squeegee the excess epoxy off with a chunk of old rtv mould rubber that I keep around for this exact purpose

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Regards,
Joel
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby greenman407 » Tue Sep 14, 2010 9:37 am

I have the sneaking suspicion that you have done this before. Looks like you are having a lot of fun!!! :D
There are OLD pilots and there are BOLD pilots but there are very few OLD BOLD pilots. MAG
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Re: Monstrosity! 1/72 Seawolf

Postby ManOwaR » Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:41 am

This foam technique is alot of fun for sure. Lots more time involved too, but at least I have the piece of mind knowing that the shafts are straight - first shot!
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