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Airbrush advice needed

Post your favorite modeling 'tips' and 'tricks'

Postby KOEZE » Mon Dec 29, 2003 12:39 pm

I intend to buy myself an airbrush but since I never used one I'd like to know about your expiriences with them. Which one do you own and how do you like it.
What would you recommend to an absolute (airbrush) beginner?

EJK
You don't stop playing because you get older,
you get older because you stop playing.
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Postby TMSmalley » Mon Dec 29, 2003 1:58 pm

___
There are two basic types of airbrush - single action and double action. The single action is pretty much like a spray can - push the button and air comes out to push the paint out. It is best if you have a bunch of paint to put on like priming or base coat work.

The double action, through the use of a trigger that also pulls back to control the amount of paint can do a lot more. If you have the option - start with a single action (much more forgiving and less touchy) and move up to a double - or buy one of each.

I have a couple of Badgers and a couple of Paasche brushes and they all have their uses. I like the Paasche VLL best because it is left handed and a little easier for a lefty like me to use. Whatever you get, be sure to get a collection of the bottles that you can store the various colors in.

A lot of guys are buying the Testor Aztek brushes and really like them, though I haven't tried one yet. Maybe NEXT Christmas!

Also - find a good airbrush book or video and religiously go through EVERY excercise and master it so you know how to get the various effects; masking, spatter, fine lines, chrome, etc. - even if you aren't planning on opening a body and tanning airbrush shop in St. Maarten. (Hmmm, maybe a good retirement job! :D )

Clean the brush thoroughly EVERY time. They can be VERY touchy if they get a tiny bit of paint stuck in the nozzle, needle, etc.

Don't mess with Propel type products. As the pressure in the can drops, your spray pattern and paint texture will change. The more you use it, the can gets colder, causing a pressure drop as well. If possible get a tank type compressor to avoid the pulsing from a tankless unit.

Use a moisture trap. Nothing is more frustrating to have a drop of water squirt out and mess up your job.

and practice Practice PRACTICE!

Paasche Website - go to the Products area.

Testors website - go to products/airbrushes

NOTE: Testors has a nice airbrushing models piece on the web at
Testors airbrushing models info.




Edited By TMSmalley on 1072720971
Tim Smalley
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Postby sam reichart » Mon Dec 29, 2003 2:30 pm

I have used a double action airbrush (Badger) for more than 20 years...and just got a new Paasche VL for Christmas... (actually, it's on its way...they sent a "V" by mistake: mine) I bought it from www.airbrush-depot.com. They are actually sending me the new one without asking for the old one back til I receive the new one, and they didn't charge shipping or handling for the new or the return of the old, even though it was my fault (I picked "V" instead of "VL" on the online order form...) I used fellow member Dave Burkett's VL to paint my Type VIIc conning tower, and liked it very much. He also uses a couple of Iwata's which are high end artist type brushes for photo retouching, etc.

Anyway, once you decide on which one you want to buy, go to their website. Great folks to deal with. Good prices.

I agree with Tim...stay away from Propel too. Too expensive, too variable - get a nice small compressor. With Propel costs, you'll recoup the compressor investment in no time.
Cheers,
Sam




Edited By sam reichart on 1072722708
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Postby Sub culture » Mon Dec 29, 2003 3:45 pm

I've got an Aztec airbrush. They're reasonably priced, and very easy to clean, as you just detach the nozzle and dump it in a pot of thinners!

Re compressors, you can fashion a good airbrush compressor using an old fridge compressor. They run virtually silent too!

Andy
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Postby Tommydeen » Mon Dec 29, 2003 11:43 pm

I have had a few. first i started out with an axternal mix by
binks good brush but on externals you cant get a fine line like
you can on an internal(depands on what you want to do with it) right now i have a testors/azteck its not bad, its an internal mix which makes it slightly harder to get it clean. one thing about the testor/azteck is that if you drop it on the floor
it will instantly busts into a million pieces! been there done that lesson learned.. right now i have been using an Iwata and love it!!!! Iwata has come out with a new line of airbrushes. i picked up my Revolution 4500 CR for 89.98$ I also have an iwata i picked up at half off and it was still 150.00$ and piants a line thats supper thin!!!!!! the thing i like about
IWAta is that they are all 1:all metal 2: simpler to clean 3:
less moving parts. i have found that you have to keep an airbrush almost hospital clean to keep it working properly and the best tool to clean an airbrush is an ultrsonic cleaner.the good ones start out at about 150.00$ another thing you want to get to go with an aircompressor is a air/water separator. you dont want to be laying a nice coat of paint on your pride and joy and all the sudden a big splat of water garfs up your paint job!!! AAAAHHHHH!!! hopes this helps
oh heres web site for iwata www.iwata-medea.com
Tom
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Postby KOEZE » Sun Jan 25, 2004 8:25 am

I've decided to go for a airbrush but all the stories of people having trouble with the cans of air made me build a compresor first. I found plans for a silent compressor using a fridge compresor and since I had a freezercompressor (big sucker) I built mine around that. I used a gas tank (propane) as used in campers and stuff like that (5kg) as a reservoir. These have been tested up to 30 bars.
The first tests showed that it works great. 8 bars in 3 minutes looks good to me. I have some trouble with moisture in the air at present but need to fine tune the setup since my moisture trap does not seem to work.

I'll keep you guys up to date and thanks for your replies.

EJK
You don't stop playing because you get older,
you get older because you stop playing.
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Postby kd6hq » Sun Jan 25, 2004 12:18 pm

EJK

You may find that you need more that on water trap.
I use one on the output of the compressor and on the output of the tank. I have a friend that uses a long hose between the tank and the painting area so he uses a 3rd at the painting station. Good luck

don
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Postby KOEZE » Mon Jan 26, 2004 3:52 am

I received a couple of emails where I found the plans for the compressor.

This is where.
Just follow the links on top of the page. They are scans from a magazine in which everything is described.

Air brush compressor

EJK



Edited By KOEZE on 1075103563
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