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Nit pickie question - NAUTILUS anchor type

Nautilus, Seaview, and more

Postby modelnut » Sat Nov 08, 2003 3:36 pm

http://www.nvo.com/baldtus/po003data/

This link leads to a history of anchors. The pertinent bit comes a good way down the page.

In 1852 a British Commission declared the Trotman anchor "Best". By 1859 the Mushroom type of anchor appeared as an instrument especially suited for permanent moorings. With the removal of the stock, from Mertom's anchor of 1861 and the advent of Lathem's anchor 1886 the use of stockless tumbling-fluke anchors increased rapidly. In 1866 the ball-and-socket type of stockless anchor first appeared in England.

So my question:

What kind of anchor would Nemo have used on the NAUTILUS circa 1869?

An anchor with a stock would have been awkward. The modern hinged anchor hadn't yet been developed.

The USS MONITOR had a four-point anchor (launched January 30, 1862.) http://www.mariner.org/monitor/09_today/image_page/anchor.html

A mushroom anchor mounted directly beneath the bow as in the SKIPJACK makes the most sense. But from what I know of the period no ship would have sailed with only one anchor. Anchors tend to get lost. And in changing currents one anchor won't hold the ship steady. (The Statutes of Genoa of 1441 AD required a 1500-ton ship to carry 12 iron anchors of from 1600 to 1800 pounds each.)

I had imagined two in the bow (p/s) and maybe two in the stern (p/s). Must make up my mind soon. I am in the detailing phase now that the hull is 99% complete.

I know that nowhere in the book does it mention that the NAUTILUS ever rested at anchor. She was stuck on a reef once. But the times that she waited for her captain to come back from a walk about the sea floor, she must have been anchored.

Don't mind me. I am just trying to get inside Nemo's head here. :p

Hmmm. No mention is made of small manuevering propellers amd engines either. But modern subs have them...

-Leelan




Edited By modelnut on 1068320377
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Postby Michael » Mon Nov 10, 2003 9:39 am

I remember Nemo telling Aronnax (in the novel) that he designed the Nautilus to rest on the bottom. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find that text through searchs of the several electronic copies I have.
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Postby modelnut » Mon Nov 10, 2003 3:45 pm

Yes. I remember something along those lines. Or at least I think I do.

But this would have made exiting the ship through a ventral hatch kind of awkward.

Or do Nemo et al go through a lock-out procedure when going EVA? I don't remember them going into a room that fills with water before a hatch is opened. But I might be wrong.

-Leelan
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Postby Crazy Ivan » Mon Nov 10, 2003 11:53 pm

I remember Nemo telling Aronnax (in the novel) that he designed the Nautilus to rest on the bottom. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find that text through searchs of the several electronic copies I have.


Gentlemen,

I believe you are referring to the following passage taken from the F. P. Walter unabridged translation, Chapter 22, "The Lightning Bolts of Captain Nemo", in which the Papuan natives board the grounded Nautilus in the Strait of Torres :


"The Nautilus is not aground, sir," Captain Nemo replied icily.
"The Nautilus was built to rest on the ocean floor, and I don't
need to undertake the arduous labors, the maneuvers d'Urville
had to attempt in order to float off his sloops of war."


The paragraph containing this is apparently left out of some shorter translations.

:;):
George "Crazy Ivan" Protchenko
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“There are the assassins, the dealers in death; I am the Avenger!”-Nemo
"I'm disinclined to acquiesce to your request; means No!"-Capt.Barbossa
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Postby Michael » Wed Nov 12, 2003 9:35 am

Or do Nemo et al go through a lock-out procedure when going EVA? I don't remember them going into a room that fills with water before a hatch is opened. But I might be wrong.

Taking a cue from "Crazy Ivan", I got this from F. P. Walter's translation, which he's placed in the public domain. You can find it on line, wth Milo Winter's illustrations in Zvi Har'El's Jules Verne Collection, http://JV.Gilead.org.il/. From Part 1, Chapter 16, "Strolling the Plains":
"Captain Nemo," I said, "this is an ideal, easy-to-use weapon. I ask only to put it to the test. But how will we reach the bottom of the sea?"
"Right now, professor, the Nautilus is aground in ten meters of water, and we've only to depart."
"But how will we set out?"
"You'll see."
...
The Ruhmkorff lamp hanging from my belt, my rifle in hand, I was ready to go forth. But in all honesty, while imprisoned in these heavy clothes and nailed to the deck by my lead soles, it was impossible for me to take a single step.
But this circumstance had been foreseen, because I felt myself propelled into a little room adjoining the wardrobe. Towed in the same way, my companions went with me. I heard a door with watertight seals close after us, and we were surrounded by profound darkness.
After some minutes a sharp hissing reached my ears. I felt a distinct sensation of cold rising from my feet to my chest. Apparently a stopcock inside the boat was letting in water from outside, which overran us and soon filled up the room. Contrived in the Nautilus's side, a second door then opened. We were lit by a subdued light. An instant later our feet were treading the bottom of the sea.
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Postby modelnut » Wed Nov 12, 2003 12:13 pm

Thanks Michael!

I haven't been able to find my copy of 20K though I have been looking. I honestly couldn't remember how they went EVA in print.

??? All I could remember was the diving sequences from the Disney movie.

:cool: This will be less work anyway. I will put one mushroom anchor on the bow and one astern just because. And I won't have to cut a hatch into the belly of my model after all. I can get by with panel lines instead.

Thanks!
-Leelan
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