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7 crewmen trapped in Priz DSRV - @196m down

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Postby Bradv » Fri Aug 05, 2005 6:39 am

See the story on Pravda

I'm sure all our prayers are with them.
The sea is the common enemy of all brave submariners, no matter what their country.
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Postby Novagator » Fri Aug 05, 2005 6:40 am

I was just coming here to post that story.

Russians trapped on sea bed in sub

Friday, August 5, 2005; Posted: 4:57 a.m. EDT (08:57 GMT)


MOSCOW, Russia (CNN) -- Efforts are being made to rescue seven Russian navymen after their self-propelled deep-sea diving vessel became snagged on the Pacific floor by a fishing net and some sort of cable, a navy spokesman said.

The vessel, called a bathyscaphe -- a kind of mini-submarine -- was at a depth of some 190 meters (623 feet) in the Berezovaya Bay, about 70 kilometers (43 miles) from Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russian news agencies reported.

A camera sent down in the water shows that during a dive, the vessel's propeller became stuck in a fishing net, snagging further when the crew tried to free it, said Igor Dygalo, Russian navy spokesman. Some kind of cable or wire was also involved, he said.

Russia has requested a vessel from Japan, he said. It was en route to the scene, along with a Russian vessel. Military officials are trying to figure out the best way to rescue the crewmen, who cannot leave the vessel because of its depth, Dygalo said.

The crewmen have enough food and water for five days, he said, but would not say how long their air might last. Russian media reports said it may be as little as two days.







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Postby tsenecal » Fri Aug 05, 2005 12:31 pm

this is also front page news on cnn.com
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Postby Wayne Frey » Sat Aug 06, 2005 9:28 am

I have sent word to Russia of our payers are with them
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Postby Captain Nemo12 » Sat Aug 06, 2005 9:41 am

I read a similar case in one of my books where it is stated that Dr.Robert Ballard (did I spell his name right?) got trapped with his crew aboard the minisub Delta got its prop entangled while on its mission to observe the sunken Lusitania. Luckily, the Delta was equipped with a prop-detach system where the propeller can be detached from the sub in case of misadventures. I just saw this on the news and I really hope that the men will be home and safe very soon.
280 meters.... and she's still in one piece!
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Postby Dolphin » Sat Aug 06, 2005 12:28 pm

The drama heightens.......
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Rescuers Race to Free Trapped Submarine

U.S. military personnel unload a power generator from the USAF C-5 transport plane at the airport in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia Saturday, Aug. IVAN SEKRETAREVAugust 06, 2005 10:02 AM EDT
PETROPAVLOVSK-KAMCHATSKY, Russia - Russian crews looped cables under an underwater antenna snaring a mini-submarine on the Pacific floor Saturday and would try to lift them closer to the surface before air ran out for seven trapped sailors, a navy spokesman said.

Capt. Igor Dygalo described the rescue effort as U.S. and British crews with robotic undersea vehicles raced to reach the site of the accident off the remote Kamchatka Peninsula in the Russian Far East.

Authorities could not say exactly how much air remained on the mini-sub, which was some 625 feet below the surface, but an admiral said Saturday the supply should last until the end of the rescue.

Dygalo said two ships had worked a cable beneath the sub entangled in an underwater antenna assembly that is part of Russia's coastal monitoring system. Officials initially said the sub's propeller was snarled by a fishing net as it participated in military exercises Thursday.

Dygalo said rescuers hoped to raise the sub to a depth of at least 165 feet, which would allow divers to reach the 44-foot-long AS-28 and help the crew swim to the surface.

Rescuers made contact with the crew Saturday evening and said their condition was "satisfactory" despite temperatures of 41 to 45 degrees in their vessel, Russia's Pacific Fleet commander, Adm. Viktor Fyodorov, said.

It wasn't clear how contact was being made or why it was only intermittent.

"I assure you, work is continuing without interruption through night and day and will not stop until we actually lift our guys up to the surface," Fyodorov said in televised comments.

U.S. and British planes flew in unmanned submersibles, known as Super Scorpios, on Saturday. They were being taken by ship to the accident site and could be used to cut the sub loose from the entangling equipment if the Russian effort to lift the vessel failed. Russian news reports said the antenna array was held down by two concrete anchors weighing 60 tons.

The plea for international assistance underlined the deficiencies of Russia's once-mighty navy and strongly contrasted with the sinking of the nuclear submarine Kursk five years ago, when authorities held off asking for help until hope was nearly exhausted. All 118 crew died in that accident.

But even with Moscow's quick call for help, rescue workers were racing to free the men before their oxygen ran out.

Navy officials gave varying estimates of the air supply. Rear Adm. Vladimir Pepelyayev, deputy head of the navy's general staff, said Saturday the air would likely last to the end of the day and possibly through Sunday. Fyodorov gave a similar estimate, but later was quoted by the Interfax news agency as saying there was enough to last until Monday.

"I think it should be enough to last to the end of the (rescue) operation," Pepelyayev said.

Fyodorov said a ship with the British equipment and rescuers should arrive at the site by 9 a.m. local time Sunday (4 p.m. EDT Saturday), Interfax reported.

The cash-strapped Russian navy apparently has no rescue vehicles capable of operating at the depth where the sub is stranded. Its rescue efforts have focused on trying to grab and drag the sub to shallower water using trawling gear.

The array of confusing and contradictory statements darkly echoed the sinking of the Kursk. That disaster shocked Russians and deeply embarrassed the country by demonstrating how the once-mighty navy had deteriorated as funding dried up following the 1991 Soviet collapse.

The new crisis underlined that promises by President Vladimir Putin to improve the navy's equipment have apparently had little effect. Authorities initially said a mini-sub would be sent to try to aid the stranded one, but the navy later said the vehicle wasn't equipped to go that deep.

Putin was sharply criticized for his slow response to the Kursk crisis and reluctance to accept foreign assistance. By midday Saturday, Putin had made no public comment on the latest sinking, but Russian media said Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov left for Kamchatka after a Kremlin meeting of top security officials.

The airlifting of a U.S. underwater vehicle to Kamchatka marks the first time since World War II that a U.S. military plane has been allowed to fly there. Since Soviet times, the peninsula has housed several major submarine bases and numerous other military facilities, and large areas of it are off limits to outsiders.

Copyright 2005 Associated Press.
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Postby Dolphin » Sat Aug 06, 2005 10:42 pm

http://www.navy.mil/view_photos_top.asp

http://www.navy.mil/view_ph....t_row=1
http://www.navy.mil/view_ph....t_row=1


U.K. Vehicle Lowered to Aid Russian Sub

August 06, 2005 5:57 PM EDT
MOSCOW - Crews began lowering a British remote-controlled underwater vehicle to a Russian mini-submarine trapped deep under the Pacific Ocean on Sunday, hoping to reach seven trapped crewmen before their air supply ran out.

British crews were working with Russian naval authorities to lower the Super Scorpio unmanned robotic vehicle down to the sub, which was snarled by a military listening antenna 625 feet below the surface nearly three days ago.

Capt. Igor Dygalo told The Associated Press that workers began lowering the Super Scorpio at around 11:30 a.m. local time.

Meanwhile, an American team with two more vehicles was being loaded onto a ship not far from the port of Petropavlovsky-Kamchatsky, and was expected to leave shortly for the rescue site in Beryozovaya Bay, about 10 miles off the east coast of the Kamchatka Peninsula.




Edited By Dolphin on 1123391380
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Postby Bradv » Sun Aug 07, 2005 3:50 am

They're free!!!!

All 7 men are OK - thanks to the Poms and a quick responce by all.
Good to see this great news. :D
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Postby Sub culture » Sun Aug 07, 2005 6:08 am

Yep, nice to see some good news for a change.

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Postby Captain Nemo12 » Sun Aug 07, 2005 7:40 am

Phew! :)
280 meters.... and she's still in one piece!
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Postby Dolphin » Sun Aug 07, 2005 2:41 pm

Image

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http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i....LOC.gif

Rescued submariners return to Russia
Vessel with 7 sailors aboard was freed by British unmanned submersible.

Updated: 11:09 a.m. ET Aug. 7, 2005
PETROPAVLOVSK-KAMCHATSKY, Russia - Seven people on a submarine trapped for nearly three days under the Pacific Ocean were rescued Sunday after a British remote-controlled vehicle cut away undersea cables that had snarled their vessel, allowing it to surface.

The seven, whose oxygen supplies had been dwindling, appeared to be in satisfactory condition when they emerged, naval spokesman Capt. Igor Dygalo said. They were examined in the clinic of a naval ship, then transferred to a larger vessel to return to the mainland.

About five hours after their rescue, six of them were brought to a hospital on the mainland for examination, waving to relatives as they went in; the seventh was kept aboard a hospital ship for unspecified reasons.

The mini-sub's commander, Lt. Vyacheslav Milashevsky, was pale and appeared overwhelmed when he got off the ship that brought the men to shore. But he told journalists he was fine before climbing into a mini-van to take him to the hospital.

His wife, Yelena, earlier said she was overjoyed when she learned the crew had been rescued.

My feelings danced. I was happy. I cried, she told Channel One.

The sub surfaced at 4:26 p.m. local time Sunday, some three days after becoming entangled in 600 feet of water off the Pacific Coast on Thursday and after a series of failed attempts to drag it closer to shore or haul it closer to the surface. It was carrying six sailors and a representative of the company that manufactured it.

The crew opened the hatch themselves, exited the vessel and climbed aboard a speedboat, said Rear Adm. Vladimir Pepelyayev, deputy head of the naval general staff.

I can only thank our English colleagues for their joint work and the help they gave in order to complete this operation within the time we had available that is, before the oxygen reserves ran out, he said.

Race against time
The men aboard the mini-sub waited out tense hours of uncertainty as rescuers raced to free them before their air supply ran out. They put on thermal suits to insulate them against temperatures of about 40 F inside the sub and were told to lie flat and breathe as lightly as possible to conserve oxygen.

To save electricity, they turned off the submarines lights and used communications equipment only sporadically to contact the surface.

The crew were steadfast, very professional, Pepelyayev said on Channel One television. Their self-possession allowed them to conserve the air and wait for the rescue operation.

In an echo of the Kursk sinking, President Vladimir Putin had made no public comment by Sunday on the mini-sub drama. Putin remained on vacation as the Kursk disaster unfolded, raising criticism that he appeared either callous or ineffectual.

But in sharp contrast to the August 2000 Kursk disaster, when authorities held off asking for help until hope was nearly exhausted, Russian military officials quickly made an urgent appeal for help from U.S. and British authorities. All 118 people on board the Kursk died, some surviving for hours as oxygen ran out.

Series of rescue attempts
As U.S. and British crews headed toward the trapped sub, Russian officials considered various ways of freeing the vessel.

Russian ships had tried to tow the sub and its entanglements to shallower water where divers could reach it, but were able to move it only about 60-100 yards in the Beryozovaya Bay about 10 miles off the coast of the Kamchatka peninsula, which juts into the sea north of Japan.

By Sunday afternoon, a British remote-controlled Super Scorpio cut away the cables that had snarled the 44-foot mini submarine and it was able to come to the surface on its own.

Even the British rescue was hampered though. A mechanical problem with the Super Scorpio forced workers to bring the rescue vehicle to the surface, just after the discovery of a fishing net caught on the nose of the submarine, Russian officials said.

The United States also dispatched a crew and three underwater vehicles to Kamchatka, but they never left the port.

Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov, who went to Kamchatka to supervise the operation, praised the international efforts.

We have seen in deeds, not in words, what the brotherhood of the sea means.

Officials said the Russian submarine was participating in a combat training exercise and got snarled on an underwater antenna assembly that is part of a coastal monitoring system. The system is anchored with a weight of about 66 tons, according to news reports.

The subs propeller initially became ensnared in a fishing net, they said.

Echoes of Kursk sinking

The events and an array of confusing and contradictory statements with wildly varying estimates of how much air the crew had left darkly echoed the sinking of the Kursk.

Russias cash-strapped navy apparently lacks rescue vehicles capable of operating at the depth where the sub was stranded, and officials say it was too deep for divers to reach or the crew to swim out on their own.

The submarines problems indicated that promises by Putin to improve the navys equipment apparently have had little effect. He was criticized for his slow response to the Kursk crisis and reluctance to accept foreign assistance.

The new crisis has been highly embarrassing for Russia, which will hold an unprecedented joint military exercise with China later this month, including the use of submarines to settle an imaginary conflict in a foreign land. In the exercise, Russia is to field a naval squadron and 17 long-haul aircraft.

New criticism arose within hours of the mini-subs crew being rescued. Dmitry Rogozin, head of the nationalist Rodina party in the lower house of parliament, said he would demand an assessment from the Military Prosecutors Office of the navys performance in the incident, the Interfax news agency reported.

Rogozin said he wants to know why Russia has not acquired underwater vehicles similar to the ones provided by Britain and the United States and why fishing nets and cables litter the area of naval maneuvers.

It appears the naval command is not in control of the area of naval exercises, he said, according to Interfax.

© 2005 The Associated Press.




Edited By Dolphin on 1123440176
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Postby Novagator » Mon Aug 08, 2005 7:59 am

I have read that they were entangled in a fishing net, but some places let it slip that it was in fact a sosus listening device. I wonder which is it really was.
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