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World's Smallest Submarine ? - BBC New Article

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Postby bcliffe » Fri Jul 30, 2004 8:58 am

Tiny submarine makes big splash
Australian researchers have built what they claim is the world's smallest submarine: a 40cm-long, self-controlling submersible called Serafina

Image


The tiny submarine, no bigger than a toy, can dive to around 5,000 metres (16,500 feet), turn, somersault and perform a range of scientific tasks.

Its designers say the Serafina could be used in shipwreck recovery, in search and rescue and may have military uses.

The Serafina has a plastic hull, five propellers and rechargeable batteries.


Being small, for a submersible, is not only a very good thing to have but is actually a very excellent thing
Dr Uwe Zimmer

It can travel at the relatively fast underwater speed of one metre per second, equivalent to walking pace, and can hover, tilt and right itself if overturned.
Dr Uwe Zimmer said his department of systems engineering team at Canberra's Australian National University had refined the design so the submersibles could be produced relatively cheaply, starting at about A$1,000 (US$700) each.

Its development and production costs were a tiny fraction of what autonomous submersibles usually cost.

"Being small, for a submersible, is not only a very good thing to have but is actually a very excellent thing," Dr Zimmer said.

"To handle a fully-blown autonomous submersible, you need to have a crane, you need to have a specialised boat, you need to have a calm sea, you need to have a full crew on the sea to operate the vehicle.


"This is a big improvement."
Dr Zimmer added that the Serafina's small size made it much easier to pressurise than larger submersibles.

The only problem it seems about its size, is that it could possibly be eaten by an aquatic creature.

It can be programmed in advance and last on a mission, with its current battery capacity, for up to a day.


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/3939355.stm

Published: 2004/07/30 10:55:38 GMT

© BBC MMIV
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Postby petn7 » Fri Jul 30, 2004 10:08 am

a plastic hull that can survive 5000 meters?

what kind of plastic is that?
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Postby dietzer » Fri Jul 30, 2004 10:17 am

It's pressurized plastic. They increase the pressure inside the WTC to offset the pressure outside the WTC. That's why the plastic doesn't implode.

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Postby rarmada » Fri Jul 30, 2004 10:54 am

Check this one:

Medical Submarine

Axel
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Postby David H » Sun Aug 01, 2004 2:17 am

G'day,

There was an article in the Sydney Morning Herald about it. Should have cut it out huh? :)
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Postby Novagator » Sun Aug 01, 2004 7:30 pm

rarmada wrote:Check this one:

Medical Submarine

Axel

:cool:
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Postby Terry Weber » Mon Apr 04, 2005 12:36 pm

bcliffe wrote:Tiny submarine makes big splash
Australian researchers have built what they claim is the world's smallest submarine: a 40cm-long, self-controlling submersible called Serafina

Image


The tiny submarine, no bigger than a toy, can dive to around 5,000 metres (16,500 feet), turn, somersault and perform a range of scientific tasks.

Its designers say the Serafina could be used in shipwreck recovery, in search and rescue and may have military uses.

The Serafina has a plastic hull, five propellers and rechargeable batteries.


Being small, for a submersible, is not only a very good thing to have but is actually a very excellent thing
Dr Uwe Zimmer

It can travel at the relatively fast underwater speed of one metre per second, equivalent to walking pace, and can hover, tilt and right itself if overturned.
Dr Uwe Zimmer said his department of systems engineering team at Canberra's Australian National University had refined the design so the submersibles could be produced relatively cheaply, starting at about A$1,000 (US$700) each.

Its development and production costs were a tiny fraction of what autonomous submersibles usually cost.

"Being small, for a submersible, is not only a very good thing to have but is actually a very excellent thing," Dr Zimmer said.

"To handle a fully-blown autonomous submersible, you need to have a crane, you need to have a specialised boat, you need to have a calm sea, you need to have a full crew on the sea to operate the vehicle.


"This is a big improvement."
Dr Zimmer added that the Serafina's small size made it much easier to pressurise than larger submersibles.

The only problem it seems about its size, is that it could possibly be eaten by an aquatic creature.

It can be programmed in advance and last on a mission, with its current battery capacity, for up to a day.


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/3939355.stm

Published: 2004/07/30 10:55:38 GMT

© BBC MMIV

Sounds like maybe you could buy a Serafina sub for your very own? Is that True? How about the parts like the sonar system? I think someone from the Membership should get those guys to write an articale for the SCR.
Terry
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Postby bcliffe » Mon Apr 04, 2005 1:26 pm

Terry,

Sorry, I don't personally know. My impression is that this was developed as a University research project, which probably means it is not commercially available.

My guess is to get the real scoop on the project you would need to get in touch with Dr. Uwe Zimmer, I did a quick google and found the following:

http://www.transit-port.net/Uwe.Zimmer/

The Serafina homepage:

http://users.rsise.anu.edu.au/~serafina/

I have no personal affiliation with this project, just spotted the story on the news wires.

Cheers
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Postby Captain Nemo12 » Tue Apr 05, 2005 6:14 pm

Looks a lot like a PVC pipe sub with those propeller drive pods, I bet someone can make a RC version that can dive at a safe depth. Looks simple though, maybe throw in a couple of channel mixers and connect them to the drive pods.
280 meters.... and she's still in one piece!
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