Banner Ad 1

Foam Sculpting Tool.

Post your favorite modeling 'tips' and 'tricks'

Foam Sculpting Tool.

Postby Bigdave » Mon Mar 26, 2007 12:56 pm

Doing some work on my dolphin boat I was using a tool I came up with to sculpt foam. It is very simple and cheap. :wink:
When I need to remove sections of foam from the inside of the hull when using the lost foam method this works great. It is basically a 100watt-soldering gun and some custom bent 12-gage wire. You can get these real cheap at places like Harbor Freight. 8)
Just remove the stock iron tip and replace it with the 12-gage wire bent to whatever shape you need. It will take a minute or so for the wire to heat up enough. This beats trying to cut it out with a knife. :evil: When I get it down to a smaller amount of foam left I melt the rest out with Acetone. In this boat I wanted to leave a good amount of foam in the front for emergency floatation. This tool made it easy to scoop out the front and leave what I wanted to save. :D BD.
Image
David Welch
Commodore SR-8

Image


"Eat your pudding Mr Land". "I ain't sure it's puddin" James Mason-Kirk
Douglas, 20K
User avatar
Bigdave
SubCommittee Member
 
Posts: 2775
Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2003 8:33 am
Location: Rochester NY

Postby Crazy Ivan » Mon Mar 26, 2007 5:03 pm

Nice work, BD. Aside from stores using them to cut and seal the ends of nylon rope, that is the first and only good use I have ever seen for that type of gun. In fact, I'm kinda ticked that I never thought of doing that. :evil: To take it one step further, that iron might even be made to power a more traditional hot wire foam cutter. Lots of possibilities suggesting themselves here.
George "Crazy Ivan" Protchenko
Image

“There are the assassins, the dealers in death; I am the Avenger!”-Nemo
"I'm disinclined to acquiesce to your request; means No!"-Capt.Barbossa
User avatar
Crazy Ivan
SubCommittee Member
 
Posts: 619
Joined: Sun Feb 23, 2003 2:42 am
Location: Rochester, NY, USA

Postby Mylo » Mon Mar 26, 2007 6:55 pm

Agreed,

.....I believe I know what I'm going to do with my soldering gun.

One foam cutting tool with multiple / exchangable wires, coming up.

Thanks BD, simple little suggestion, fantastic idea and yes, I feel somewhat stupid for not thinking of it without "help".

Mylo
"I don't have anything else planned for this afternoon." - Lt. Col J.O.E. Vandeleur

A Bridge Too Far (1977)
User avatar
Mylo
Registered User
 
Posts: 731
Joined: Sat Aug 06, 2005 8:10 pm
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada

Postby Bigdave » Mon Mar 26, 2007 9:45 pm

Thanks Guys! I have about 5 different sizes and shapes. The longer the wire the longer it will take to heat. The wire I am using is 12 gage copper house wire. If you go too thin on the wire you could melt it. :cry: Unless you are using Nicrome wire. Just be careful. :D BD.
David Welch
Commodore SR-8

Image


"Eat your pudding Mr Land". "I ain't sure it's puddin" James Mason-Kirk
Douglas, 20K
User avatar
Bigdave
SubCommittee Member
 
Posts: 2775
Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2003 8:33 am
Location: Rochester NY

Postby Larry Kuntz » Tue Mar 27, 2007 7:59 am

Nice piece of work BD. A suggestion, if you need the wire to be stiffer and straighter I use a technique called "spinning" Simply put, you anchor one end of the wire in a vise and the other to a hand drill. It's like bending a piece of copper wire back and forth. It eventually becomes hard and breaks. Slowly give it a few turns, the more you turn it the more brittle it becomes. Low and behold a harder and straight piece of wire, and still able to be formed. Works great for any time you need a very straight piece of wire from coiled soft wire.
Larry Kuntz
SubRon8
ImageImage
User avatar
Larry Kuntz
SubCommittee Member
 
Posts: 362
Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2003 9:44 pm
Location: Churchville, NY USA

Postby Bigdave » Wed Mar 28, 2007 5:32 pm

Thanks Larry. Very interesting. :wink: :wink: 8) BD.
David Welch
Commodore SR-8

Image


"Eat your pudding Mr Land". "I ain't sure it's puddin" James Mason-Kirk
Douglas, 20K
User avatar
Bigdave
SubCommittee Member
 
Posts: 2775
Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2003 8:33 am
Location: Rochester NY


Return to Modeling Tips and Tricks

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users