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Place for general submarine conversation

Postby TheFreak » Mon Aug 11, 2003 2:21 am

Hey iam new to R/C submarines and need some direction on how to get started.

What is the best way to start out?



Any help would be greatly appreciated Thanks.
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Postby Robse » Mon Aug 11, 2003 7:05 am

Hi, and welcome!

I'm a first time builder as well, and I would recommend the following:

1) Do your research, learn the sub basics. Scan as many fellow subbers's homepages as you can, read about their work, experiences, and results. Borrow books at the library about sub technology as well, never hurts to get the basics down, right?
2) Deside on which design you like the best. Sub'a comes in many different designs, and sizes. You'd sure like one that you're proud of later on, right?
3) Look for a complete kit, UNLESS you're into electronics, AND can do mechanical work with no problem. A surface ship can drift to shore if it fails, AND the insides are normally dry.. it's completely different with a sub. Faliures, even small ones, have the potential to grow into an expensive total loss of boat.
4) KIS. (Keep It Simple) Taking on a few challanges is good, but drowning your self before completion in technical difficulties will scare you away from the sub hobby, and we sure like to keep you around. :)

I'm doing an Ohio class sub, a 2m (6ft) from scratch (Except the hull, buying that from www.thordesign.com )) Take a look at my page at http://hjem.get2net.dk/robse/SSBN/SSBN.htm and see if it helps you on your way deciding the correct approach for you, into this GREAT hobby.

Also, take a look at www.ThorDesign.com for kits, hulls etc. and don't forget to "shop around" a little, until that perfect kit stares you into the eyes.

Sub's technology holds a few supprices along the way through design, and fitting. Lean on other builders, and get ready to learn about positive and negative buoyancy, compressed air, static vs. dynamic dive systems, radio issues and alot of other things. You've got hours and hours of great fun ahead! Good luck. :)
Yours Sincerely, Robert Holsting, Denmark
1/81 SSBN Ohio Class scratch builder, more at www.robse.dk

"Never be afraid to try something new; remember that it was amateurs who build Noah's Ark, and professionals who build the Titanic"
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Postby Seawolf » Mon Aug 11, 2003 11:00 am

Sorry, didn't mean to Spam or other disadvantage purpose. I just want to express my feeling about ur site Robse.

It is GREAT :) - I think I will learn a lot from ur technique, even I haven't start to get wet into the RC world.

thanks for the site.

rgd,
Fiat
Fiat - Jakarta (Indonesia)
sshhh.... rig ship for ultra silent..........
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Postby subdude » Mon Aug 11, 2003 11:58 am

Might I humbly suggest that you consider joining The SubCommittee? Our quarterly magazine, The Report, is full of all kinds on info on building R/C subs, details of the real thing, how-to info, etc. Also, the camaraderie of joining up with fellow sub modelers can't be beat. Nothing quite like getting together with a dozen other guys running subs and sharing ideas.

Best Regards,

Jim Butt
Membership Chairman, The SubCommittee
Underwater, the ONLY way to fly!

SubCommittee member #0069 (since the dawn of time)
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Postby Robse » Mon Aug 11, 2003 1:35 pm

Hi again.

Thanks, SeaWolf! Great to hear some positive responce on my site. :) I'll update it as work progresses. (More pic's later this week)

SubDude: Yes, you're right. Sorry I forgot to mention it. I'll be joining shortly myself. :)
Yours Sincerely, Robert Holsting, Denmark
1/81 SSBN Ohio Class scratch builder, more at www.robse.dk

"Never be afraid to try something new; remember that it was amateurs who build Noah's Ark, and professionals who build the Titanic"
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Postby TheFreak » Mon Aug 11, 2003 3:00 pm

Thanks everyone for all you help I really enjoyed robse website it is wonderfull. I havent finished reading all the material there but I will. I also have one more question how far can a Remote Control System reach through water? Basicaly I wanna know how far I could take my sub underwater if I had hull that could withstand the waterpressure.
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Postby Seawolf » Mon Aug 11, 2003 8:46 pm

Robse, u're welcome :) - u earn the credit :)

quite related to what TheFreak posted, I'm thinking of a simple subs that can move, dive and surface - using remote control system instead of radio control.

if say, the subs it self is waterproof, and using a dynamic diving system - we can have the power from the controlling unit (battery, etc) with a cable run up to the boat. It will be limited to certain range of course but for start what do you think ?
Fiat - Jakarta (Indonesia)
sshhh.... rig ship for ultra silent..........
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Postby Robse » Tue Aug 12, 2003 4:36 pm

Hi again.

First of all, thanks both :)

To the Q's:

1) How far can a radio control reach into the water:
Well, it depends on the water. Salty & pools are the worst, fresh water lakes are the best. Typical radios can go about 6-8 ft. into the water with no problem, but if you build a system where your antenna is draged behind the sub in a surface-towed sonar in a long cable while the sub is submerged, that problem is solved.

As you can see in the section above, the radio will not make all it that deep, unless you build the "Towed sonar" idea. Please see this link for more info on sub radio issues: R/C Submarines

2) The run-by-wire:
Hmm.. Normally in a model sub, the hull is not water tight, but all of the things inside is build into small(er) water tight compartments ("WTC"'s), and *they* set the max depth. My compartments can withstand a pressure of at least 2.5 bar (Maybe more, tested to 2.5 only), which is equal to the pressure at 25 meters / 82ft.
I guess it would be possible to use a control box with all of the controls, and a cable all the way down to the sub. They did it when they discovered and explored the Titanic, and other wrecks, using real subs, so why not us as well? The problem as I see it, is that the cable will most likely get cought in something within long.

Normally, most subbers stay within the 6-8 ft. of the surface. One reason is the radio issue, another is the fact that you won't be able to see the sub at greater depth. Still, when designing, remember to design with safety in mind. Build it do endure quite a safety margin, it's quite hard to estimate depth when diving, and what happens if your sub is supposed to stay at max. 6-8 ft, can endure only 10 ft, and your sub dives to 15 ft some day by accident? The worst scenario is when the sub integrety is compromised.
Yours Sincerely, Robert Holsting, Denmark
1/81 SSBN Ohio Class scratch builder, more at www.robse.dk

"Never be afraid to try something new; remember that it was amateurs who build Noah's Ark, and professionals who build the Titanic"
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Postby Robse » Wed Aug 13, 2003 1:18 pm

just lettin' you know: Just updated the site with images of both WTC's, holding R/C stuff, engine, electronics, servos, batteries, valves etc... take a look at http://hjem.get2net.dk/robse/SSBN/SSBN.htm and look for the sections under "My Results"

Also added: Information about radio range in various waters, and ideas to solve this. (Inspired by you guys, thanks.)

Talk to y'a later. :)
Yours Sincerely, Robert Holsting, Denmark
1/81 SSBN Ohio Class scratch builder, more at www.robse.dk

"Never be afraid to try something new; remember that it was amateurs who build Noah's Ark, and professionals who build the Titanic"
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