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Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue Jun 11, 2013 12:16 am

Guys,

After numerous domestic distractions over the last several weekends (heck, months!), you'll be glad to know I'm finally back to work on Harder.

Taking advantage of a rare day off from work today, plus a honey-do-free day at home, the Porteous Boat Yard is suddenly back in business. I even dragged out and cranked up the ol' '40s music CD collections while I worked—how can one expect to make like Rosie the Riveter building a WWII-era American submersible without the appropriate caterwauling in the background? Yes, no one was sitting under apple tree but Harder and me.

Actually, that's not quite true: first came a field trip to Plastruct (based here in Los Angeles) for Part No. PS-33: sheets of thin styrene that exactly mimic the teak deck planking molded into the 1/72 scale Revell Gato superstructure. Why do I need it? Well, I don't need it yet, but the real Harder's teak deck actually extended all the way forward and all the way aft, so I intend my conversion/build-up to eventually have the exact same look. (Those owning this same kit will note that a good portion of its generically reproduced deck represents metal; the #PS-33 offering from Plastruct thus might be of use to many of you building or planning to build specific boats out of this popular model.)

Also, for anyone who cares, I finally got my little Blueback's lighting reinstall finished and touch-ups completed. After pretty much of a do-over (difficult!) the last time I tackled it, her whole sail now lights up properly again. No, she's not as pretty as she used to be, but she's had a lifetime of tough patrols and involved refits, so she's earned her less glamorous looks. Last time I ran her she still ran well, and that's what counts. So anyway, back up on the shelf she finally went, clearing the workbench so I can concentrate on Harder once again.

Today's labor on Harder was a continuation of the attack on her keel flood holes. The photos below tell the story: I've been cutting and applying my flood hole template (see above entries) in sections after knifing out the hole shapes themselves. With the template in place, I've started to scribe the shapes onto the hull. This is tougher than it sounds (involving detailed concentration and plastic and metal shape templates) and I could only handle a few before needing a break and trying something else. This is when I buttoned up Blueback and got her out of the way. Then I chose to actually start drilling out a few keel holes to see how they would look.

I found that working with styrene is more difficult than I'd anticipated. It's softer than a fiberglass hull, yes, but not as forgiving, easier to make permanent mistakes. Each hole also takes a very long time with assorted files and sandpaper.

My first two attempted oval holes didn't turn out all that well, but were certainly adequate. The circular ones were a little easier and turned out better. I certainly hope to improve overall with practice—there are plenty of holes left to go!

Hope to get back to it next weekend.

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Till next time,
Jeff P
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby raalst » Tue Jun 11, 2013 2:54 pm

You might know it already, but just to be sure :
If you want to file a SQUARE hole, use a TRIANGULAR file.

I learned that one from old metal workers, and it works. a square
file requires you to keep it's angle exactly in place, which is impossible.
with a triangular shaped file you can work one side of the hole at a time without
mauling other sides.
Regards,

Ronald van Aalst

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Just here to Learn
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby BoomerFunker » Tue Jun 11, 2013 8:39 pm

Looking nice Jeffty, congrats on getting in some bench time.

Say, here's an idea on those ovals I picked up from the illustrious Dave M himself. He uses brass tubing. He scores the end of an appropriately sized tube with a X-acto blade, burring it up, and effectively making a hand powered circular saw from the thing. You could cut the two end circles of the ovals that way then carve out the middle. It's pretty easy to control once you've made the primary score, like scribing a panel line. Just an idea.



Ahem.... and not to complain or anything but technically this isn't a "repair" it's a "build" and there is a delightful ongoing thread over in the build area that needs some love. :D

Of course I'm a fine one to talk. To much distraction with the nice weather!

TomK
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:11 am

Tom,

You're right, of course. I forgot all about our original Gato build forum. Will try to post there henceforth, maybe even re-post a few of these shots first. Thanks!

JeffP
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Wed Jun 12, 2013 12:19 am

Oh, and Ronald, you're quite right too: using a triangle file is great advice...which I just happened to find out by myself through trial and error!

JeffP
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue Jul 23, 2013 1:08 am

I've got a Whale of a Tale to tell ya, lads. Yes, that's right, I've temporarily set Harder aside to put a couple of days into my too-long-ignored Custom Replicas Disney Nautilus. It was indeed fun to take a break and work on something different! Here are pix:

Keel-mounted flood grates after being "pickled" by etchant. Rivets have been enhanced for more relief, this time using Tulip "Slick" fabric paint. A tip from Steve Neill.
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Likewise for "atomizers".
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"Atomizers" get primed on one side—the side that goes toward the hull and thus will be difficult to hit with primer later.
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I have a t-shirt which reads: "I'm an English Major: You Do the Math" for a very good reason. For the life of me I couldn't figure out how to numerically crunch 2.25 inches into the twelve equidistant spaces I needed to properly position the "atomizers". Then I remembered the ad layout program I use at work which does this sort of thing automatically for arranging columns of type and such. Voila! And you said no practical good would ever come of my checkered advertising career...
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Making openings on the template.
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Positioning the template.
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Spots are now marked.
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Carefully drilling out.
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Pretty nice 'n' even.
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Working with the Big Girl.
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Grates go in.
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"Scoops" go on. All these scoops are not just CA'd, but affixed with tiny segments of brass rod too. Don't want them popping off around that 19,000th league.
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Gentlemen, we have "atomizers". Note nice removable part covering the electrical jack seen in previous shots.
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More scoops aft. Plus an aft "vent".
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Other details with the scoops—tethers—if you look closely. Note how the scoops are actually scooped out. A super idea from Paul Crozier.
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More next time,
JeffP
Last edited by JefftyToo on Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JWLaRue » Tue Jul 23, 2013 11:57 am

JefftyToo wrote:For the life of me I couldn't figure out how to numerically crunch 2.25 inches into the twelve equidistant spaces I needed to properly position the "atomizers".
JeffP, I hope you don't mind my providing this...

Since most of us don't have the nifty layout tool that JeffP uses, here's a quick and easy method that requires no math:

Step 1: layout a line with the correct number of equally spaced marks, the spacing isn't relevant. I usually make it something simple like 1-inch spacing. In the diagram below, the item labeled "A" shows 12 equally spaced items.

Step 2: layout a line that is the correct overall length for where the 'equally spaced items' need to fit. In the diagram below, the item labeled "B" shows a 2.5-inch segment (like JeffP's).

Step 3: Draw a perpendicular from one end of the line drawn in step 2. The length isn't important, but needs to be long enough for step 4. Bear with me, it'll make sense soon! In the diagram below, the item labeled "C" shows the 2.5-inch line with a green perpendicualr drawn.

Step 4: Take the line from step 1 and rotate it so that one end is anchored at one end of the line from step 2. Item "C" shows it anchored at the right end of the line. Then continue rotating it until the other end of the line intersects the perpendicular drawn in step 3. You can see this at the top left in item "C" in the diagram.

Step 5: Now just drop a series of perpendiculars from the now angled line from step 1 down to the line from step 2. Instant correct spacing. These are the red dashed lines in item "C" in the diagram.

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-JeffL

p.s. For those who prefer the math: space-between-parts = overall-desired-length / (number-of-spaces - 1)
Rohr 1.....Los!
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue Jul 23, 2013 11:54 pm

JeffL:

Ingenius! Touché!

JeffP
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Mon Jul 29, 2013 1:50 am

Speed screw, pumps and piping installed. Plenty of CA, plus brass pins for the speed screw.

JeffP

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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue Oct 01, 2013 1:24 am

Hi guys,

Have in recent days managed to spend a little more time with Nautilus.

Anchors epoxied in:
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Keel diver's hatch mounted:
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"Atomizer" drill-through holes filled in with Milliput:
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Later,
JeffP
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Re: Jeff Porteous's Repair Yard

Postby JefftyToo » Tue Oct 08, 2013 2:18 am

For anyone interested, Seaview here undergoes a refit to be ready for her annual appearance at the West Coast Fall Fun Run in San Francisco in a few weeks.

I've moved the bow access panel's clip-on tabs a little outboard and JB Welded them on more robustly. These clips will really keep the piece from falling off now. (I tested it!)
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This strip of waterproof automotive LED lights has been epoxied together to form a circle (thank you, John Wayne) to concentrate its illumination. It's now a successful replacement for each of my failed earlier Observation Room overhead lighting systems: Steve Neill's original LED triplet and my own prior replacement of LED model strip lighting, unfortunately not waterproof as expected.
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The bright "warm white" LEDs used for the twin manta (under keel) lights kept coming out of their friction-fit sockets and/or breaking their wire connections. So here I've soldered the LEDs directly to Dean's mini-connectors, covered their connections with epoxy to waterproof them and, in the shot after this one, hot-glued them into their sockets. They're not coming out of there now! And they're not gonna break either!
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Voilá—my bow lights are working again!
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More later,
Jeff
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